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All right, the MacGyver MasterCard commercial? Pretty adorable.



Retirement is definitely ‘agreeing’ with RDA… by which I mean, as others have noted: lookin’ a little pudgy there, dude. Though, I think the effect is exacerbated by the clothing, which is very MacGyver-authentic of course. I always thought that some of what Mac wore (particularly the chinos) didn’t make him look as slender as he was, even back in the day when he was ridiculously slender. The combo of those pants, the layers of shirts, and that jacket – classic, but not figure-flattering for an older man. (In later season MacGyver, he also had some quintessentially 80s jeans that were, frankly, a crime against nature, and against the great ass that he definitely had under there.) Watching it and the “making of” stuff, I also kind of wondered whether some of the bulk wasn’t protective layers underneath.

But the upshot is, yeah, he’s definitely put on some weight since we last saw him on SG1. Doesn’t really surprise me, though.

I have to say that I thought the decision to dye the hair was odd (but, it was a good dye-job, I’ll give them that). Just because… already, the hair isn’t MacGyver hair, in its cut. Though RDA jokes about the mullet in the interview, it wouldn’t have had to be a mullet, any longer, shaggy hair would have been MacGyver-ish. But given they decided against a wig… was there that huge a difference in recognition between a brown-haired older MacGyver, and a grey-haired one?

Clearly the commercial is taking for granted that viewers will “know” that time has passed and Mac is older now. I didn’t think they were trying to fool the viewer into thinking that was a flashback. At that point, your main recognition of Mac is in the clothes and the actions. Most viewers (assuming they haven’t really seen RDA in years and years, and I think we have to assume that for a lot of the viewers, probably for most) are going to take a moment to decide whether that’s the same actor or not anyway. Does the brown hair really help that much? To me, it just looks weird, because… you can see that the guy is much older-looking than the last time you saw MacGyver, and at that point, the hair color really doesn’t match the man’s age.

But probably I’m wrong, most viewers wouldn’t think about it that deeply (they can’t anyway, it’s a short commercial). I’m just kind of interested by the question of the efficacy of such a small detail, but one they clearly considered was important.



SG1: Ethon

This episode was a sequel to a S7 ep, “Icon”, that I didn’t like very much at the time. That was an episode written by Damian Kindler, and I thought that it showcased a number of his weaknesses – interesting world and idea, static execution, big chunks of exposition, long stretches of people talking at each other in paragraphs instead of doing things, and finally, requiring the characters to do something weird and OOC in order to have an ep at all (in that case: letting Daniel go back to that planet at all, and then leaving him there).

So I wasn’t that enthused to find out that this was a follow-up. And when I saw that the story was by DK and RCC, and the teleplay was by DK, I became even warier.

However, I want to state for the record – I thought this was a good episode. More, I thought it was written pretty well. I was able to spot a few Kindlerisms, but they didn’t hugely overshadow the ep. On the contrary, I thought he pulled off more of a genuine sense of drama and tension, not to mention emotion, than I normally associate with him. It’s probably not difficult to get drama/tension into your ep when you are given the chance to BLOW UP THE PROMETHEUS. (Yow!) But it would actually be possible to squander that or to bobble the aftermath of it – and neither was the case in this ep. Rare props from me to the show and to Kindler.

On the one hand, I remain somewhat unmoved by the Orii/Priors as the Big Bad. On the other hand, I thought this ep demonstrated an interesting feature of the situation they’ve set up with the Orii – now that the Priors can show up anywhere in our galaxy, they can basically take any civilization the SGC has met at any time in the past, and turn them into our enemies. Not that we were buddy-buddy with the Rand Protectorate anyway, but here we see them become a different kind of enemy and a new threat. It’s interesting to comtemplate that even people with whom we parted as friends could pop up turned into enemies.

Certainly, like the SGC, I did not for a moment think that the satellite weapon would prove a match for the Prometheus. So I enjoyed being truly shocked, there. The staging of the ship’s death was also really well done. I especially liked that they gave the audience time to react, until they had Mitchell voice aloud basically the same reaction. I’m going to miss the Prometheus, ugly as it was, and even though it had been superceded by the Daedalus. (I’m also left wondering, as I’m sure we’re meant to, whether the Daedalus would have fared any better.)

I thought this ep was a good example of how you can split the team up, but still have them feel like a TEAM, all working on different pieces of the same problem, and all caring for each other. Given what happened to him LAST time, I was fairly surprised that Daniel was allowed to go to the planet alone again, but that bugged me less because it became clear that they thought they had that covered (such as putting that locator beacon on him – hmm, need to find a better place to hide that!) In particular, I thought the emotions in the aftermath of the Prometheus’s death were very well done – that was a point where they could have bobbled it, and didn’t.

I liked that they had Pernaux be the one to take out Nadal, in the bunker. Not just because I liked that there was someone moderate still left, and that it was the military guy, but because I liked the idea of them solving that problem internally. One thing I somewhat didn’t like, but they didn’t really have time to deal with it, was the attempt to convince the Caledonians to take the Stargate and use it to skedaddle. I felt like that exhibited too little appreciation for the way in which people become loyal to their land or their planet. Minister Chaska made the token protest – but I would really have liked to see it turned around on the Tau’ri, and have someone question how blithely they would be willing to abandon Earth. The history of the U.S. alone shows that people who are forced to abandon their homeland do not remain content with mere survival of their population.

Finally, I liked the bitter, “we didn’t really win” ending. That felt very classic SG1 to me, and it was played well, as it’s not Mitchell’s first taste of that, but I think he is just starting to get a feel for what Daniel already knows, how OFTEN the SGC doesn’t actually triumph. In this case, the SGC lost a LOT, for pretty much no return that I know of (except perhaps intel on the weapon that the Priors can give to people).

This was, though, the first really new-team-y ep that I’ve felt was wholly successful in a long while. I’d like to see them build on that.

Note: I do believe that what Cameron handed to Daniel was a can of Coors Light. Which… oh, Cameron, honey. First: it being light beer doesn’t make it okay to drink on base. Second: COORS LIGHT? I feel for Daniel so much. It took him years and YEARS to wean Jack gently away from the Budweiser and towards the better beers like Heineken and Guinness. Now he has to start over at square one with Cameron. Poor guy.

Another note: I was wondering immediately after the ep what the hell the title meant. SG1 and its freakin’ vague or obscure one-world titles get on my nerves after a while anyway, and this seemed especially non sequitur-like. But upon looking it up, I find that Ethon was the name of the eagle that was set upon the chained Prometheus, you know, the one that kept coming back and eating Prometheus’s liver. Kudos to the research team or whoever it was who tracked that down, because that’s not a piece of information that one normally finds in summaries of the Prometheus myth. (I can honestly say I don’t think I’d ever come across it.)

Of course, the point of the eagle Ethon was that it subjected Prometheus to eternal torment but NOT destruction. Ehn, *handwave*. It’s still a nice little memorial for the ep that doubtless WILL be remembered as the Prometheus’s swan-song. I am reminded strongly of Jack’s observation during one of its earliest voyages (from S6’s “Unnatural Selection”):

O’NEILL: They didn’t go for it.


CARTER: So what didn’t they go for?

O’NEILL: The name I suggested.

CARTER: For the ship.

O’NEILL: Yeah.

CARTER: Sir, we can’t call it the Enterprise.

O’NEILL: Why not?

CARTER: The code name for the project is Prometheus. What’s wrong with that?

O’NEILL: It’s a Greek *tragedy*. Who wants that?


Ah, Jack. How prescient you were. Should we be thinking about the fate of Daedalus?

(ETA: Apparently katie_m thought to ask the same question about the ep’s name, and tracked down the answer. I’ve been trying not to read others’ reviews of the eps before I write them up, so I’m not sure how many other folks noted this.)



SGA: The Tower

I wasn’t that taken with this ep. It just struck me as sort of “ehn”. It was nice to see Jay Brazeau back (he played the Lord Protector, and is previously familiar to SG1 watchers as loopy robot Harlan, the guy who made the robot doubles of SG1). It was also nice to see them undercut John’s space-babe-magnet reputation – personally, I’m bored with that, but I did laugh out loud at his “I just never see this coming” line.

Ronon’s mad fighting skillz were pretty darned impressive, and we liked Teyla’s eye-roll. But I really felt like I was watching the John’n’Rodney show again, and that Ronon and Teyla were pretty peripheral to the main action of the ep. And I tell you – after watching yet another bunch of villagers struggle their way through Alien-Speak (no contractions, plus a certain pompous kind of delivery of lines that really gets on my nerves after a while), I am more grateful than ever for their decision not to saddle Ronon with that, and for Jason Momoa’s acting. I’m used to it now in Teyla, but I prefer she remain the only example of it that I have to deal with on a regular basis. (I feel like she, and Chris Judge, are two actors who figured out a way to transcend the limitations of that characterization; but most guest actors I think do not.)

Interesting new information that we got on the little squid things (which I prefer as a term to “drones”). I had to think about it for a moment before I realized that it didn’t actually contradict any previous examples of them in action that we had. Prior to this, I had somewhat assumed that once you gave them an order, they tended to go out and seek/destroy sort of on their own – but then, I preferred to think of them as semi-sentient, in a way. (They had a somewhat organic appearance, when we first saw them, including the way they moved.) But this made really, really clear that they require an ongoing power-source and/or an ongoing set of orders. And really, that makes even clearer what was happening back during their debut in “Lost City” on SG1 – it explains how Jack became drained so thoroughly, since apparently he was obligated to direct all of them at all of their various different targets during the Antarctic battle.

Finally, I would like to know when they will start making meta jokes about that village seeming kind of familiar. Isn’t that like the 4th or 5th time we have seen it this season on both shows?



BSG: Scar

My deep thoughts on this one consist of: *daaaaamn*.

Also, I have liked since the mini-series the innovation of making the Cylon raiders just, a Cylon, not a ship with a cockpit with a humanoid Cylon sitting in it. I thought that was so cool and creepy, and such a fabulous but utterly logical idea. Here it really pays off for them, too. I don’t know why it never occurred to me – as apparently it never occurred to the people on Galactica either, so I guess I don’t feel bad – that the raiders could resurrect just like the human-form Cylon. Yikes. But Sharon’s logical is inassailable – of course it’s valuable to retain that experience. Though she doesn’t really address the negative aspects, even whether there are any, of the build-up of trauma.

telepresence pointed out, and I agree that I liked, that this whole plot had to do with two women who were, thank god, not talking about their boyfriends and not fighting over a guy, or anything else like that. Their rivalry purely had to do with their criticisms of each other based on an ungendered issue, and on competition to be recognized at the best at what they do in an ungendered way. I loved the moment when Apollo assigns them to patrol together because he wants “his two heavy hitters” teaming up; and his two heavy hitters are women. That’s pretty cool.

One thing that Telepresence mentioned, though, is that the ep was nice because people have seen Starbuck as a bit of a Mary-Sue, and it was nice to see her rendered somewhat imperfect.

I went away and thought about that, and what I wound up thinking was this: if Starbuck were being played by a man, would anyone criticize the character as strongly for being a Mary Sue? I’d like to hear someone explain to me again what it is that makes Kara/Starbuck a Mary Sue, exactly (I personally don’t see it), and whether that would be applied equally if the character were male. (I’m not thinking that *nobody* would criticize a male Starbuck for the same things, I’m just wondering if as many would, or if it would be such a prominent criticism of the character.)


Also, today, I did my taxes. Go me.

Comments

( 19 comments — Leave a comment )
catspaw_sgjd
Feb. 5th, 2006 12:17 pm (UTC)
But the upshot is, yeah, he’s definitely put on some weight since we last saw him on SG1.

I like the new, chunkier look ::is a hopeless fangrrrl:: :-) Although I'm betting the camera adds pounds, as usual. My guess would be that he's gone from scrawny to normal in RL :-)
eregyrn
Feb. 5th, 2006 05:11 pm (UTC)
Oh, dude, yeah -- I totally don't mean it in a bad way. :) When I was watching it again, too, I was thinking that it's not a "camera adds pounds" thing so much as a thing where the make-up is on and it's geared towards different shooting conditions (film), while the interview (where I notice it the most) was on video and had totally different lighting. That does odd things too.
catspaw_sgjd
Feb. 5th, 2006 10:59 pm (UTC)
Good point about the makeup and lighting - and I think video is an unforgiving medium anyway. (At least I hope it is, having seen myself on video ::wince::)
eregyrn
Feb. 6th, 2006 10:23 am (UTC)
*nods* It seems to me that video is the most unforgiving of all. And given the visible difference between video and film, it just strikes me that I bet you do make-up for film quite differently than for video -- and I further bet that what works best for make-up for the one doesn't work best for the other. Because the make-up isn't meant to address the same issues of the medium.
cofax7
Feb. 5th, 2006 12:30 pm (UTC)
He really did put on some weight, although I noticed it most in the face, which was significantly fleshed out. Ah, well, retirement after many many years of maintaining fighting weight, must be pretty nice. I don't begrudge him.

I agree that a little grey in the hair would not have gone amiss, though.

As for Ethon, well, I thought it was a series of catastrophic decisions, starting with the idea that they could just waltz in and blow up someone else's weapons platform while sending Daniel back alone, again. I expect Jack will most definitely have words for both Landry and Mitchell on this. It's one thing if they pulled it off -- but the whole thing backfired so completely that in any kind of reality-based scenario, Mitchell would very likely have been subjected to a severe reprimand, possibly even losing his command.

I have thoughts about a very uncomfortable visit from BG O'Neill...
eregyrn
Feb. 5th, 2006 05:20 pm (UTC)
Ah, well, retirement after many many years of maintaining fighting weight, must be pretty nice. I don't begrudge him.

Me neither. I was thinking something along the lines of, man, how gruelling the tv schedule is, and the travel schedule he was on, and then finally you retire -- heck, I'd go on a little "vacation" from all of that regimen too! I wouldn't blame him at all if he took a good while to just sit on his ass, if he wanted to.

Though, I was watching it again, and thinking that some of it might have been some make-up and video weirdness in the interview. Because to me, I didn't notice the weight in the face in the commercial so much, just in the figure -- but as I was noting, that's deceptive with the clothes and so on.

On the ep -- I don't disagree with your points; paian went into it in more detail in her LJ, too. I just had such rock-bottom expectations of this ep, that I was pleased to be able to take anything away from it, and I did like the emotional depth. I also got a sense that the theme being aimed for here was the SGC having an arrogance about their abilities, and the point was how blithely they had overextended themselves. Helped, unfortunately, by any number of non-reality-based decisions.

I expect Jack will most definitely have words for both Landry and Mitchell on this. It's one thing if they pulled it off -- but the whole thing backfired so completely that in any kind of reality-based scenario, Mitchell would very likely have been subjected to a severe reprimand, possibly even losing his command.

This is the thing -- it happens in every DK-written ep, practically. Even Jack and Hammond weren't immune from sometimes criminally dumb decisions in eps past. At a certain point, I just disconnect from DK's eps. I've ranted and hated in my day. Now I'm just resigned to it and trying to get out of it with whatever bright spots I can.
jenlev
Feb. 5th, 2006 01:07 pm (UTC)
good point about the brown hair in the macgyver commercial. although as i watched it i felt that i was looking at jack. or maybe, that was just my wishful thinking. ;)

and very good point about how it still felt like a team episode even when they were separated. and oh yes to a different location for the locate-beam thingy. in interesting example all around of how their confidence hit a wall.

hee! daniel will think of it as a mission to convince cameron what real beer is. lovely ending scene, with the consequences very real. and the losses so huge.

had to look up the word ethon too.....and yikes, jack was quite on target. *sigh*

as for sga, yikes....the outfits cracked me up for some reason. and the harpsichord music. you're right about john's reputation and the line he spoke that cracked me up.

hmmmm....i thought the village looked familiar. ;)
eregyrn
Feb. 5th, 2006 05:23 pm (UTC)
although as i watched it i felt that i was looking at jack. or maybe, that was just my wishful thinking. ;)

No! It's funny, but I thought the same thing. I kept thinking, "that's a very Jack demeanor he's got, not a very Mac demeanor". It's subtle, but... something about his facial expression. Not that you can't sometimes see glimpses of Jack in Mac... but I think it's a distinct thing. :)
jenlev
Feb. 6th, 2006 02:24 am (UTC)
yes, something around the eyes and the set of the mouth. glad my wishful thinking wasn't just running away with me. ;)

:::misses jack anyway:::

telepresence
Feb. 5th, 2006 01:42 pm (UTC)
"I went away and thought about that, and what I wound up thinking was this: if Starbuck were being played by a man, would anyone criticize the character as strongly for being a Mary Sue?"

Far fewer. Some would, but not nearly as many. Now of course, many people adore Starbuck, so that's cool. But yeah the superskilled male hero is something we're so used to. There's a whole thing going on in some corners of NCIS fandom...but you don't watch NCIS so I won't get into it, suffice it to say apparently "Tony is a woobie, Ziva is a bitch".
eregyrn
Feb. 5th, 2006 05:26 pm (UTC)
Yeah, that's kind of what I thought, and it annoyed me. I'm used to that mindset that fans get into, where *any* OC but especially any OFC is a Mary Sue, and *any* superskilled female hero gets accused of Mary-Sue-ism, and I'm like, *NO*. Because that way lies an inability to have major kick-ass female heroes.

A male Starbuck just wouldn't meet so much of that criticism. Made me actually want her to have beaten Cat. But at least Cat's female too.
telepresence
Feb. 5th, 2006 05:36 pm (UTC)
That's why I love BSG, even when it's flawed. Don't like some pushy woman as the top gun? Fine, we'll replace her with..another woman. Suck it, old guard "I can't believe they made Starbuck a girl" people.
wadjet_theperv
Feb. 5th, 2006 01:44 pm (UTC)
I'd like to see the new Rick. If he's put weight on it's not going to be good for his knees though, but having said that, getting around any of you lot wouldn't be much good for his knees either ;)

Re: BSG and the Cylon ships, I love that concept, just as I loved the organic ships of the Vorlons and the Shadow ships in Babylon 5. I also love the way that in this version of BSG they have an *extremely* hot female Starbuck - hence the icon - and that the demarkation between humans and Cylons is distinctly blurred. Lovin' it. Or at least I will be when it gets here!
eregyrn
Feb. 5th, 2006 05:59 pm (UTC)
I'd like to see the new Rick. If he's put weight on it's not going to be good for his knees though, but having said that, getting around any of you lot wouldn't be much good for his knees either ;)

I bet that ways to spare his knees could be figured out. O.O But seriously, :) I was thinking of that, actually. Between the knees and the back...

Looking back at it, though, I don't think he's actually gained as much as the combo of clothes and weird make-up/video make it look. The commercial was shot in Dec., and in the pics from the winter-sports thing he did in Jan., he doesn't look that heavy. Plus, that shows he's still active.

On the other hand, he's entitled. :) I'm sure that maintaining fitness and weight for a tv show is a bitch. I don't blame him at all for slacking off on that.

Did you see that Catspaw has links up to dl the commercial and the interview and behind the scenes stuff?

And speaking of downloads -- were you able to download the Canucks' flute intro before? If not, I can resend it. Also, I thought you'd like this:

http://www.fizzandvinegar.com/media/lovethisgame/download.html

This is where I got most of the segments of this DVD that was distributed to season ticket holders right after the 03/04 season. (I edited the soundtrack out of chap. 15, to get the flute music.) So, if you haven't seen this -- I figured you'd want to!
surreallis
Feb. 5th, 2006 01:57 pm (UTC)
Excellent write-up. Re: the Mac commercial, I with you on the gray. The weight was a little surprising to me because I'd always figured RDA for the sort who had a hard time keeping weight on, but that's what age does sometimes. Still, I felt he looked a bit odd without the gray. He was able to carry it off ten years ago when he was first starting Stargate, but I think he's aged enough in appearance to have passed that point now. I'd have been all for keeping him gray at the temples and giving him back some color in the roots, but eesh. Still... RDA!

Prior to this, I had somewhat assumed that once you gave them an order, they tended to go out and seek/destroy sort of on their own – but then, I preferred to think of them as semi-sentient, in a way. (They had a somewhat organic appearance, when we first saw them, including the way they moved.) But this made really, really clear that they require an ongoing power-source and/or an ongoing set of orders.

See, I thought that too before this ep. And the new information has confused me somewhat, but maybe I missed something. It would seem to me the drones would still have to have their own power source inside themselves (which is why the sentient/organic theory works well) in order to fly. Is the control chair somehow sending power out as a signal to them? Or do they actually have their own power source, but it's the chair itself that keeps the drones *turned on*? Maybe a constant signal is needed to make them do anything, but wouldn't the Ancients have found some sort of fail safe to prevent that from happening, so that the drones would carry out their last orders if the chair was destroyed? I'm actually trying to make it work in my mind, because, well, it's science fiction afterall and I prefer *not* to ask 'why' but 'why not?'

Also, good on you for getting your taxes done early! I hope you're getting a nice, big refund! :)
eregyrn
Feb. 6th, 2006 10:55 am (UTC)
The weight was a little surprising to me because I'd always figured RDA for the sort who had a hard time keeping weight on, but that's what age does sometimes.

What it made me sort of realize was how gruelling physically a job on a tv show must be (not to mention what his travel schedule was like for the last few years there), and also how much work the actors must really put into staying fit for it.

Yeah; I think that "going grey" would have been a good compromise for them. The more I thought about it, the more I think that doing his hair and brows all brown for the commercial was a mistake, because -- there's just no way to hide that the guy has aged since the show was last seen. It's silly to even pretend that he's younger than he is -- neither the figure nor the face fits that. Just go with the joke that MacGyver is still MacGyver after all these years, even greying. When you dye the hair brown, it just makes it look like the commercial is trying to fool the audience, and it patently can't. I guess that's what bugs me about it.

It would seem to me the drones would still have to have their own power source inside themselves (which is why the sentient/organic theory works well) in order to fly.

See, I would think that too. Because to me, the chair being the conduit to send the ZPM's power to the individual squids seems weird to me. And as you point out, counter-productive to their function.

Say you're Atlantis or another city, and you're under attack. There are certainly circumstances in which the city's power could be interrupted, but the city remain intact and the people within not be killed yet. In that circumstance, you ABSOLUTELY DO NOT want all the missiles you've fired to just STOP WORKING. Because that means that any interruption of power for any reason whatsoever, and your city is doomed. But I can easily imagine a chain of events in which you *desperately* want the missiles to be destroying their targets WHILE you are frantically trying to get the power back online, or frantically trying to evacuate the power-less city. Sheesh.

Furthermore, a design that requires an operator in the chair to be giving the squids constant reinforcement for them to continue towards their target... boy, is that fraught with difficulty, too. That is a design that fails to ask certain common-sense questions, such as -- is there any way for the chair operator to be killed and nobody to be able to take his place immediately, short of total annihilation? Because, again -- say the chair goes down, but the rest of the city and those within it don't. In such a case, wouldn't it be valuable to *their* survival for the squids to complete their destruction of what the chair fired them at?

The more I think of it, frankly, the more I think it just does NOT work. That in this episode, they all turned off (or went *poof* or whatever the hell happened to them, it was hard to tell) merely because it was the only solution that kept Ronon and Teyla from being obliterated. But otherwise, it really makes no sense.

Although if it is true, then that adds a whole other layer to my understanding of how it is the Ancients lost the war with the Wraith -- DUMB weapon design.

(The only other big piece of info that we had on them was in "Rising" where the squid accidentally gets shot at Sheppard and O'Neill's chopper. Carson accidentally launches the squid... which appears to decide to target the incoming chopper "by itself" -- certainly it's hard to believe that Carson *told* it to. Further, it keeps going while he's trying to tell it to turn off, which means it's still self-propelled or at least "last order" propelled. Once he finally does get the order through to it... well, does he? Does Carson actually rescind its orders, and that's why it putters out to come to a rest against Jack's hand? Or does it run out of "gas" on its own, and the only thing that saves Jack and Shep is that coincidence? At the time, I even entertained the brief notion that its proximity to Jack somehow resulted in it "recognizing" him (and John?) as having the Ancient Gene and therefore as friend, not foe; or else, somehow resulting in it receiving the rescind "order" from Jack. Unclear.)
moonshayde
Feb. 5th, 2006 02:13 pm (UTC)
I was so taken and amused by the RDA dye job, I wrote a fic on it.

I think it's the clothes that make him look pudgy. Because really, it didn't show all that dramatically until the end scene when he was in the check out line. But I do believe he'd added a few pounds. Nothing wrong with that. He was getting frightfully thin there for awhile.

Loved SG-1. Hated SGA. Had no idea that was Harlan, though I spotted some guy from Prisoners. Didn't get to watch BSG.

Being a myth buff, I loved the Ethon reference ;)
barkley
Feb. 5th, 2006 06:10 pm (UTC)
Maybe the average person won't notice the gray! OK, see, when I first starting watching SG1, I (and don't tell anyone) never noticed that the first season was a bad dye job. I just kind of thought his hair went grey really quickly. And now looking back on it, it looks fake, fake and more kinds of fake. I don't know what I was thinking! So maybe they're banking on more people not having watched him on SG for the past 8 years and gotten used to seeing him gray and they figure they can cover it up.
catspaw_sgjd
Feb. 5th, 2006 10:54 pm (UTC)
never noticed that the first season was a bad dye job. I just kind of thought his hair went grey really quickly

And you're not alone in that *g* - I did exactly the same. Although I agree with surrealphantast that then he could carry it off better, at ten years younger :-)

I'm just glad I'm not the only person on the planet that it never even occurred to that the s1 hair was dyed :-)
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